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Whites Think Race Equality is Nearer Than Blacks Do, Study Finds – LA Times

Posted by on 8:01 am in In the News, Racism | 0 comments

Whites think race equality is nearer than blacks do, study finds By Emily Alpert August 22, 2013, 9:00 a.m. Nearly half a century after Martin Luther King Jr. described his dream that someday people would be judged not by their race but by their character, whites think a colorblind society is much closer to reality than blacks, according to a new survey from the Pew Research Center. The findings underscore the enduring chasm between the way white and black Americans perceive racism and its continued effects, as glaring gaps in wealth and education persist between the races. In a telephone survey of more than 2,200 adults this month, 44% of white respondents said the U.S. had a long way to go before achieving racial equality, compared with 79% of black respondents. Almost half of whites said the country had made a lot of progress toward that dream in the past 50 years; less than a third of blacks surveyed by Pew agreed. In addition, whites were much less likely than blacks to think that blacks were treated unfairly in courtrooms, classrooms or other common situations, Pew found. Seventy percent of blacks surveyed said that in their community, police treated blacks less fairly than whites. About half that percentage of whites — just 37% — agreed. Among blacks, 54% said blacks were treated unfairly at work. Just 16% of whites agreed. About half of blacks — 51% — said black people were not treated fairly in local public schools, Pew found. A much smaller fraction of whites — 15% — held that opinion. Whites are more likely to believe that racial equality is within reach because “the hideous things that have happened in our history — lynchings, cross burnings, the Ku Klux Klan marching people out of town — those things have tended to disappear,” said Jerome Rabow, professor emeritus of sociology at UCLA. Whites also point to laws against discrimination, he said. But “when blacks talk about how they’re doing, it’s more about their daily lives,” Rabow said. Whites often miss the daily frustrations that blacks encounter, such as frequently being pulled over by police, or professors assuming they’re meeting with them because they did poorly on an exam, Rabow added. Latinos fell between blacks and whites on most questions, with 43% of respondents saying that the U.S. had already made ample progress toward racial equality, and 48% saying a lot more progress was needed. However, Latino respondents were noticeably less likely than blacks to say Latinos and blacks get along: While 78% of blacks said the groups get along well, only 61% of Latinos agreed. Large majorities of black and white respondents said they believed that their two groups got along well, Pew found. Yet Pew discovered that for both whites and blacks, the feeling of racial progress that followed the election of Barack Obama seems to have faded. After Obama became president, higher shares of both groups of respondents said blacks were doing better than they were five years earlier. Since then, the numbers have dropped closer to previous levels, back down to 35% of whites and 26% of blacks, the Pew survey showed. “That Obama effect is quickly dissipating,” said Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, professor of sociology at Duke University. “Having a black president doesn’t mean much for...

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Is there a Zimmerman in your Organization?

Posted by on 9:16 pm in In the News, Racism | 0 comments

Is there a Zimmerman in your Organization?

by Dr. Jerome Rabow and Manpreet Dhillon By now most Americans know that George Zimmerman fired a weapon on someone whom he believed to be a threat. Is it possible that you have a George or Georgette Zimmerman in your organization? Without bringing guns to work, people do make statements that harm individuals, undermine morale, create anxiety and can lead to lawsuits. Such harmful statements can derive from fear, naiveté, ignorance, and jealousy. Can you imagine the following statements occurring in your organization? A White male, feeling that he wants to be completely honest, says to his Black coworker, “You’re so different than other Black people who are not very ambitious. Sometimes I don’t even think you’re Black.” A male speaking to a female colleague, feeling that he is expressing admiration, says, “I love that I can share all the jokes about women, with you, that my buddies and I make. It’s so great that I can treat you like you’re one of the guys and just enjoy myself.” “I can’t believe that you grew up in that community. I would never even drive through there because it’s too scary. It must really feel good that you never have to go back there again.” “I believe in equal rights but it really upsets me what your people are trying to do to marriage.” A male speaking to a female coworker, “You and I know why you got that promotion ahead of me and it has nothing to with your work.” A State Representative can get away with remarks like, “Gays and lesbians are destroying our nation” (Sally Kern). But it is a lawsuit waiting to happen if it is expressed by someone in your organization. These may be hypothetical examples but similar remarks have resulted in lawsuits. Sony Records believed that the lyrics in one of its songs were harmless but was fined $1.2 million for a song deemed racist.  See CCODE’s blog post: Sony Fined $1.2M for Racist Song. As employers, it is your responsibility to make sure that you suspend judgments about the lack of harm that others may feel and take racial, gender, and homophobic slurs, stereotypes, and jokes, seriously. Your workplace may be very or modestly diverse. That diversity does not guarantee respect and safety within your organization. To stop such complaints and lawsuits from occurring in your organization, take the required step and contact CCODE, if you don’t want a...

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Racism is Not Dead in America: Be Careful if You Want to Honor the Number 42

Posted by on 1:34 am in In the News, Racism | 0 comments

Racism is Not Dead in America: Be Careful if You Want to Honor the Number 42

Does the number 42 mean anything to you? Many Americans remember that the number 42 was worn by Jackie Robinson, the first African American to play major league baseball for the Brooklyn Dodgers.  When Dodger President and General Manager Branch Rickey signed Robinson, Rickey told Robinson that he was picking him because he believed that he could stand the racial animosity that he would be receiving as the first Black in baseball. While one fellow Dodger tried to undermine Robinson’s talents, abilities, and perseverance another recognized the pressure on Robinson. Duke Snider, his teammate, reported, “He knew he had to do well. He knew that the future of blacks in baseball depended on it. The pressure was enormous, overwhelming, and unbearable at times. I don’t know how he held up. I know I never could have.” Rickey knew that Robinson would never make it as a good Black baseball player but as a great baseball player. He recognized the hostility and anger that existed against bringing this great athlete who happened to be Black to a sport that had been White and had White fans that depended on seeing their own playing the game. Rickey is reported to have said, “There’s virtually nobody on our side. No owners, no umpires, very few newspapermen. And I’m afraid that many fans will be hostile. We’ll be in a tough position. We can win only if we can convince the world that I’m doing this because you’re a great ballplayer, a fine gentleman.” All this happened in 1947. Decades later, another Black athlete is playing in a sport that has also been dominated by Whites. Joel Ward, a Hockey player for the Washington Capitals wears number 42 in honor of Robinson. What happened to Ward when he scored the winning goal in a victory clinching the series over the Boston Bruins on April 25, 2012? For those of you who believe that Obama’s election and the major league’s celebration of Jackie Robinson means that racism in America is dead, please click the link below and see what many everyday people had to say about Mr. Joel Ward. “WARD TARGETED BY RACIST TWEETS AFTER OT GOAL AGAINST BRUINS” “TWITTER BLOWS UP WITH N WORD AFTER BRUINS...

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Sony Fined $1.2M for Racist Song

Posted by on 11:49 pm in In the News, Racism | 0 comments

Sony Fined $1.2M for Racist Song

Sony Records had just been ordered to pay 1.2 million dollars for a song that was deemed racist. The lawsuit was won by ten NGO’s in Brazil who argued that black women were being ridiculed and violated by the lyrical content in the song. African American women’s hair is not only a subject of ridicule in Brazil, but occurs in the United States. Does your organization allow such comments to pass as “harmless”. If so, your fate may be similar to Sony Records.  Contact us. Here is a link to the article that include the song lyrics: Natural Hair Song By Tiririca Deemed Racist, Sony Music Ordered To Pay $1.2...

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Wells Fargo: Discrimination Disguised as Help

Posted by on 8:06 am in In the News | 0 comments

Wells Fargo:  Discrimination Disguised as Help

Discrimination is often disguised as help. A recent court decision found Wells Fargo guilty of pushing African American and Latino applicants into loans that they knew were unsound. All applicants were deemed worthy of receiving a normal loan, but were made to feel that the loans suggested by the Wells Fargo agents were better and that they “the applicant” would be much smarter and better off following the agent’s suggestion. Applicants were made to feel that they were being helped while in fact they were being discriminated against. This is the kind of discrimination that CCODE addresses in its training.   Sources: Justice Dept. Fights Bias in...

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Political Psychology of Stereotyping and Ethnocentrism — Dr. Daniel Sadigh Interviews Dr. Jerome Rabow on BlogTalkRadio

Posted by on 9:18 am in In the News | 0 comments

Political Psychology of Stereotyping and Ethnocentrism — Dr. Daniel Sadigh Interviews Dr. Jerome Rabow on BlogTalkRadio

At 9pm on Thursday December 15, listen to Dr. Daniel Sadigh interview Dr. Jerome Rabow on BlogTalkRadio on the subject “Political Psychology of Stereotyping and Ethnocentrism”. Call-in number to speak with the host during the show: (909) 533-8385. Have you ever judged someone or been judged based on your culture or ethnicity? Have you ever stereotyped others just because you intended to reduce the overload of information and simplify your understanding of a group of people? There is a certain chance that regardless of your racial, sexual or religious identity, you have sub-divided people according to their language, behavior, customs, and ideologies. There is even a higher chance that you have been categorized by those who think of themselves as the “right” type of people based on their own cultural understandings.William Sumner has described ethnocentrism as the “the technical name for this view of things in which ones own group is the center of everything, and all others are scaled and rated with reference to it” (Sumner, 1906). Our society is filled with stories of racism and our communities are segregated by discrimination. Although there is considerable evidence that stereotypes can have considerable truth and stereotyping is seen as a strategy of successive approximations towards valuable generalizations in an environment of restricted information, both ethnocentrism and stereotyping can lead to racism. Race and racism continue to be major factors in the politics of many nations; therefore we need to understand such elements of political psychology. Dr. Sadigh and his guest, Dr. Jerome Rabow, will examine the theories that predict people who place a high value on their own group will tend to scorn outsiders and seriously damage the healthy relationships of being inclusive and non-judgmental. About My Guest: Dr. Jerome Rabow received his Ph.D in Social Psychology from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and started teaching at UCLA in 1965 in the Sociology Dept. where he is a Professor Emeritus. He continues to teach in the Honors College and is also a lecturer in Sociology at CSUN for nine years. Dr. Rabow is the President and Founder of CCODE (The Center for the Celebration of Diversity through Education), a diversity training organization working in the private and public sectors. He is a Licensed MFT for 35 years and practices at Encino and Century City. He has also co-authored the popular Tutoring Matters (Everything you always wanted to know about tutoring) published by Temple University Press. Click the play button to listen: rabow-btr-15Dec2011.mp3 Source:...

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RACISM: From Pain to Hope? — Dr. Daniel Sadigh Interviews Dr. Jerome Rabow on BlogTalkRadio

Posted by on 4:32 am in In the News, Racism | 0 comments

RACISM: From Pain to Hope? — Dr. Daniel Sadigh Interviews Dr. Jerome Rabow on BlogTalkRadio

At 9pm on Thursday August 25, listen to Dr. Daniel Sadigh interview Dr. Jerome Rabow on BlogTalkRadio on the subject “RACISM: From Pain to Hope?”. Call-in number to speak with the host during the show: (909) 533-8385. Click here to listen. Have you ever been subjected to discrimination? Did you ever judge someone because of his/her race or ethnicity? The chances are that regardless of your racial, sexual or religious identity, you have been both discriminated against and also in position of discriminating against others. In a world of inequities and increasing financial distance among nations, can we claim that racism does not exist? Our college campuses are filled with stories of racism and our communities are painted by the brush of discrimination. Join in and learn about the different dynamics of racism as Dr. Sadigh and his guest, Dr. Jerome Rabow, will examine cultural stereotyping, race relations, and other diversity issues. Dr. Rabow’s “Voices of Pain and Voices of Hope” published by Kendall Hunt and its third edition is a brilliant window to today’s unfair practices of shaming, degrading, and devaluing. About My Guest: Dr. Jerome Rabow received his Ph.D in Social Psychology from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He started teaching at UCLA in 1965 in the Sociology Dept. where he is a Professor Emeritus and continues to teach in the Honors College. He has also been a lecturer in Sociology at CSUN for nine years. Dr. Rabow is the co-author of the popular Tutoring Matters (Everything you always wanted to know about tutoring) published by Temple University Press. He is a Licensed MFT for 35 years and practices at Encino and Century City. Dr. Rabow is the President and Founder of CCODE (The Center for the Celebration of Diversity through Education), a diversity training organization working in the private and public sectors. Listen to internet radio with Dr Daniel Sadigh on Blog Talk...

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Dr. Laura’s Rant: When will they ever learn?

Posted by on 8:45 pm in In the News, Racism | 1 comment

Dr. Laura’s Rant: When will they ever learn?

During her recent radio show Dr. Laura Schlessinger used a racially offensive term for African Americans. She repeatedly used the N word in her response to a call from an African American woman, who was unhappy and offended by her white husband’s friends frequent use of the N word. Dr. Laura told the caller that if she was so “hypersensitive and didn’t have a sense of humor, she shouldn’t be marrying outside her race”. Dr. Schlessinger’s attack on the woman’s feelings is an insult to all professional therapists who understand that feelings are real and need to be understood, not diminished. Her attack on the woman’s choice of mate is an insult to all Americans who have chosen to marry outside their race and who are doing so in increasing numbers. Why is Dr. Schlessinger so out of touch? Is it because she is white and therefore insulated from the ongoing barbs that many non-white Americans live with on a daily basis? Is it because she is affluent and people give her recognition and respect and does not have to deal with being invisible in the way that janitors, gardeners and laborers deal with? Is it because she is a Jewish and is relatively insulated from non-Jews? Dr. Laura Schlessinger doesn’t get it because she doesn’t understand that there is a difference when outsiders use words that are pejorative and when insiders use those same words. Dr. Laura might laugh at a joke that a Jewish comic makes, about Jews being stingy but she might be offended if a non-Jew makes the same joke. I believe, she would be offended if a non-Jew used the word “kike”, let alone went on rant saying “kike, kike, kike”. If Dr. Schlesinger was hurt or offended, I would hope that no one would say to her that she is too sensitive or to religious. Just as people have different degrees of melanin; Jews have different degrees of religiosity. Would she like to be told that she has too much “Jewishness”? Words have histories. Words can harm, they can hurt, and can be used to perpetuate myths, stereotypes and un-truths. If men use the B_____ word or the C___ word amongst themselves they are perpetuating sexism without necessarily inflicting pain or fear since, women may not be in their presence. If men used those words to describe Dr. Schlessinger, she would probably be offended, and rightly so. Very few women would say she’s being too sensitive. And if women used those two words to refer to each other, they would be using the words that men have used for years to humiliate and belittle women. When women use those words however, they are rarely used in conjunction with physical abuse and are not likely to create fear. When men use these words in front of women to describe them, the reaction would probably be one of fear and terror. The B—- and C—- words have been used in conjunction with punching, beating, raping and the killing of women. Women, when they use that word would not likely punch, beat and kill other women. The N word has been used by white parents to prevent their children from going to schools or befriending African Americans. The N word has been used by police to...

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